Sunday, November 29, 2015

Manhattan Melodrama (1934)

Another post from guest blogger Debbie...

This quickly made, low budget film directed by Woody Van Dyke II , has become legendary for two reasons.

Reason #1:  It was the start of the thirteen year, fourteen film pairing of William Powell and Myrna Loy.

Reason #2:  It was the film that on July 22, 1934 lured bank robber John Dillinger out in public and subsequently to his death.

We should all be eternally grateful for both reasons.

Sunday, November 22, 2015


And now a few words from our guest blogger, Debbie!

How I love candid photos taken during a movie production.   These photos give you an insight as to what goes on during a production and also the relationship between the stars involved.

My favorite Bob Montgomery movie is “Night Must Fall” from 1937.   It is not your average Montgomery film. It was one of the first psychological thrillers.  I tad like Hitchcock except the "MacGuffin" is known from the start.   Bob had to fight to make this film and it is one of only a few from his career that he was truly proud of.  It was based on the Emlyn Williams play of the same name and concerns a psychotic killer.  The screenplay was adapted by John Van Druten and the film was directed by Richard Thorpe.  Interiors were filmed at the MGM Studios in Culver City and the exteriors were filmed in Sherwood Forest, CA.

Bob’s co-stars for this film were Rosalind Russell and Dame Mae Whitty.  Russell was cast because she worked well with Montgomery and Whitty was part of the original New York and London play cast.

It becomes obvious from these candids taken during production that Montgomery and Russell enjoyed working together.

Bob & Roz at Lunch

Bob at lunch

Chatting outside at Sherwood Forest  (This is one of my favorite photos)

Roz taking a break at Sherwood Forest

Listening to the radio between takes.  (Wouldn't you love to know what they were listening to, and wouldn't you LOVE to have that radio!!!)

A sister photo to the one above

Chatting between takes on the sound stage at Culver City

Candid photos from a favorite film, interesting stuff!!!!!!

Thursday, November 05, 2015

Happy Birthday, Joel ... Rrrrff!

                                    Joel in 1938 at age 33.

               Sharing a bed with 28-year-old Joel ... ah, to die for. 
               Joel with Constance Bennett in Bed of Roses (1933)

Tuesday, November 03, 2015

An Evening With Amanda and Elyot

It's Norma Shearer month on TCM ... all five of Bob and Norma's movies are being shown!  Yes! They're not all great, but they all have young, beautiful Bob to make them all a worthwhile watch.  My favorite is Private Lives (1931).  This is the fourth movie of the pairing, and their comfort level with each other is reflected in their performances.  And, of course, it is an excellent Noel Coward play, so the script is excellent.  I understand Irving Thalberg actually filmed the stage version for the cast to study, a first, I believe.  Additional time was given for studying the script and rehearsals, to assist Norma in developing her role.  A Noel Coward play was not Norma's cup of tea, but she apparently put a lot of effort into it, didn't exactly embarrass herself.  Bob, meanwhile, handled his role superbly.  If only he had gotten more good movies in which to show his stuff.

               Private Lives (1931) with Bob and Norma Shearer

  The movies will be shown on two nights and all times are EST.

          November 10th  -  Private Lives 8:00 p.m.
                                        Divorcee (1930) at 12:45 a.m.
                                        Their Own Desire (1929) at 2:15 am.

          November 17th  -  Strangers May Kiss (1931) at 8:00 p.m.
                                        Riptide (1934) at 3:15 a.m.

And a special bonus, Lady in the Lake (1947) will be shown on the 22nd at 8:00 a.m.  November is a good movie for Montgomery viewing.  More, more, more ...

Friday, October 30, 2015

Happy Halloween!

Watch out for the little old lady down the street ...

                      Lionel Barrymore in The Devil Doll (1936)